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Format is similar to some track meet events, with three attempts for a top score across three different game setups thus, 9 maximum plays. Rules will be released shortly before the tournament. A minibadge will be made available to all participants and prizes small but fun will be awarded to the victors. If you do decide to support Morels Foray, we wanted to make everything from our catalog available to customize the order to your taste.

Agility is here, which I'm delighted to report was nominated for the Best 2-Player Golden Geek just like its big brother, as well as additional copies of Morels and Morels Foray for friends or family. We've made a habit of printing up amusing t-shirts to complement our games. There is a set of 6 pans in the event you have the original Morels Handcrafted Pieces 16 sticks and 2 pans but would like additional pans to equip all of the players in Morels Foray with two HC starting pans rather than using punchboard tokens.

Given the early sellout of the Morels Foray Handcrafted Pieces mushroom mini and 4 wooden tokens , we've made the wooden tokens from that set available also. Won't be able to make any more mushroom minis than those already promised to the pledges, but happy to offer this piece of that pie should it interest.

New to Morels? Vintage Rahdo only his 19th review from the glass-table era! Makes for a trippy floating forest. Church bells in background are a nice Easter Egg Rahdo, aka Richard Ham, lives in Malta, where apparently churches outnumber homes like sheep to people in New Zealand from the sound of this video. This is a full game run-through:. Retail options are available! There are three different bundles to choose from brick and mortar sales only, please :. Carton size is 20, hence the 5x and 10x case quantities. If interested, please send me a message and I will quote prices.

Shipping free in the US for all three options.

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We love partnering with FLGSs! Shipping is free to the US and subsidized to the rest of the world. We would love to have offered zone specific friendly shipping, but with the added complication of handcrafted pieces and differing sources for those vs the game, it just wasn't feasible. Please note that we are not able to sell the Morels base game to Europe, South America, or China due to licensing agreements.

A1: You don't! The add-on would just be for folks who acquired Morels HC bits back in , which came with 2 pans. The 6 pans in the add-on would bring their total up to 8. A2: It isn't. We're working with Pegasus Spiele in hopes that the expansion may be ported over to the European cousin of Morels. We'll share any news as it develops. As long as everyone stays healthy, ships float, and machinery whirrs, we don't anticipate standard challenges beyond those that we have already embraced with Morels and Agility.

Morel Mushroom Sightings – Maps

One unique challenge will be keeping my hands in tact and unkindled while sawing, sanding, and polishing the custom pieces! Many enjoyable hours of work, much of that time with my fingers about 6 mm from a band-saw or rotary-saw blade at several thousand RPM. So far, so good! Questions about this project? Check out the FAQ. Note: Foray Handcrafted Pieces are the tagua nut carved mushroom mini and the 4 wooden laser-engraved tokens.

Apr 18, - May 10, 22 days. Share this project Done. Tweet Share Email. Morels Foray: the Morels Expansion. Foray expands hit 2-player game Morels with new characters, items, weather, and player capability, each with its own unique system. Two Lanterns Games. Brent Povis. Share this project. Morels Foray: the Morels Expansion St. Paul, MN Tabletop Games. Support Select this reward. Estimated delivery Nov Kickstarter is not a store.

What do Morels Look Like?

It's a way to bring creative projects to life. Learn more about accountability. Select this reward. Ships to Anywhere in the world. Shipping destination. And from a shocking live performance, to the even more consequential publication of his second novel, Arthur Morel strives to answer these large questions, and though no answers are truly found here, it provides a great springboard for some truly fascinating conversations.

By raising a lot of big questions and issues, some more open-minded book clubs may really revel in this novel. It is an interesting and even fascinating book at times even if its compelling nature is more akin to gaping at a traffic accident , but not one that I would recommend to everyone.

It covers some dark topics, and includes some really unsympathetic characters, so be prepared! Mar 16, Jaime rated it it was ok. I wanted to like this. I could barely finish it. I skimmed most of the middle, to be honest. I found it way too self-aware, almost like it was trying too hard to be clever.

I didn't find any of it humorous or compelling, and the characters felt tired and pretentious. I seem to be in the minority with my opinion, so take it with a grain of salt. View all 4 comments. Dec 18, An Nguyen rated it liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. The Morels is less like a book in the traditional sense and more like a work of modern art. Let me explain. This book works on many different levels so bear with me as I work through each of them. I once read in a Seth Godin book that modern art could be explained by two sentences uttered in a conversation: "I could have done that" "But you didn't" A lot of 'modern art' isn't technically impressive.

Consider the readymades of Marcel Duchamp which consisted of modifying and vandalizing existing object The Morels is less like a book in the traditional sense and more like a work of modern art. Consider the readymades of Marcel Duchamp which consisted of modifying and vandalizing existing objects such as a copy of the Mona Lisa or a toilet cover. Contrast this with works of art that are universally beloved from the Reinaissance such as Michelangelo's David or Leonardo's The Last Supper which showcase great technical prowess such as emotion, anatomical precision, composition, and more.

Modern art is an idea, which, once put into the world, can not be replicated. In a world where talent is abundant, originality is highly prized. Anyone can replicate modern art but few will invent it. In the same sense, The Morels is not a technically impressive book. The characters aren't particularly interesting or novel hah in many ways.

The main character is a faceless, nameless narrator that would ordinarily have no place in a book. He works in a movie theater and spends his time outside of that working on a movie, a redneck twist on Shakespeare's Hamlet more on this later. He has no real personality it seems, the entire book, does not undergo any sort real transformation save the very ending and we are not invested in his life at all. In fact, the book changes perspective from the first person the narrator to third person quite often throughout the book, and at the end, even starts talking about the narrator in the third person as if he is a stranger as if to emphasize his irrelevance more on this later as well.

Arthur, aka Art, is the real focus point of the book. He is an eccentric kid who seems very bright but lacks social abilities. His wife, Penny, is a beautiful woman who tries to do the right thing like every other character in the book it seems. And his son Will, is a energetic kid who enjoys pranks and superstitious things like ghosts and alien life. Almost every character in the book seems quite irrelevant in fact. Hacker seems aware of this as he blatantly brings forth so many cliches and stereotypes throughout the book such as the good cop, bad cop, the ruthless prosecutor, the detectives straight out of a noir novel, and so on.

The basic premise of the book is that Arthur, a husband and father, writes books. The first one, talks about a boy who is being molested by his coach that, under the advice of "you have to deal with these things or they will haunt you", shoots his coach with a shotgun and then shares a sexual moment with his therapist note the age difference and that the therapist is a man. No big deal. His second book? The Morels. A book about a family of people. In the family there is a father named Arthur, a mother named Penny, and a boy named Will. Sound familiar?

Hacker isn't very subtle here. At a point in the book, Will even talks about the book, saying, "They got the cover wrong, we aren't blonde". Everything inside the book is fairly mundane until the end, where it begins to talk about Arthur sharing a sexual experience with his son Will. I won't go into it too much but it basically involved Arthur taking a bath with Will where they begin to talk about erections and masturbation and it culminates with Arthur achieving orgasm through masturbation in front of Will. At this point, you have to question Arthur's motive here. If the book is a work of fiction, why write about a grotesque made up situation involving his son?

Why use their real names in it? If it's real, why confess to a crime? Throughout the entire book, Arthur is firm in believing that the book is a work of fiction and everyone in his circle of friends and family tolerates it as best they can. Arthur, Penny, and their immediate loved ones face embarassment and criticism from outsiders following this. In the stress and pain of this difficult time in her life, Penny cheats on Arthur with the narrator. Remember this. While Penny and her parents aren't happy with the situation, they deal with it the best that they can, until one day, Will utters two words that confirms everyone's suspicions: "I remember" Immediately Penny whisks Will away from Arthur to her parents house and gets the law involved.

Through a very long series of events we eventually arrive to the trial and the verdict in which Arthur reveals that he was sexually molested as a child. It is never explicitly revealed who did it to him but that the experience and his upbringing he grew up in a very sexually active environment with his parents regularly participating in orgies around the house made him a somewhat knowledgeable boy from a very young age. At school he would participate in sexual acts with dozens of other male students in what he describes as "a virus" sexual knowledge spreading throughout the entire school.

Despite the inconsistency in Will's stories and his own admittance to lying about the incident, Arthur insists that he must be sentenced.

Where have all the morels gone?

He does and eventually dies in prison. The ultimate conclusion that is drawn about why Arthur wrote his book was the fact that he wanted cathartic release from revealing his sexual molestation at a young age, and a fear that he would spread this virus to his son.

In a way, the book was written as a confession. In a passage about art in the book, Arthur reads from some great artist I forget who about how a story must be communicated but it should not tell. How do you tell a story without writing about it? Make the act of writing it, the story. It's the ultimate form of show, don't tell. In the deepest level, we have Arthur writing a book called The Morels. The book itself is not very good or interesting unless we take into account Arthur's own life outside of the book and the events that follow from his publishing. By writing the book, a new story has been made about the trials and tribulations he and his family go through.

Peel back a layer and you have The Morels which you pick up from the bookstore. The book itself is not that interesting itself but the thoughts it provokes and the conversations that will surely stem from it will be. A director receives a script that he likes and starts the ball rolling on film development. He casts actors and picks locations and then goes through filming each scene in the movie.

On one level, there is the story he is telling. On another, is the story that I have just told you of the director. Or what about the behind the scenes story of how the movie was made, all the conflict and resolution that had to occur to see its ultimate culmination? As human beings we can always peel back another layer. We have recursive minds. Consider that you can be stressed about being stressed. Or the fact that you know that I know that you know. At every moment, there is another story being made. I'm not sure if I'm alone in this, but throughout the entire book, I found myself asking: Did the author, Christopher Hacker, commit some atrocity in his life and was this book his own wany of confessing it?

I am nearly certain this is the desired effect of the author, whether true or not. Consider that the narrator has a surreptitious affair with Arthur's wife. Could writing this novel be a way of confessing the own author's sin of perhaps FEAR of committing that act with a real life friend?

When we stared creating computer simulations we had to ask whether we were ourselves in a computer simulation. I believe this book is an exploration of the self-referential. The narrator was making a movie about Hamlet, where in a close and trusted friend of the family kills the father and steals the wife for themself. Arthur ultimately dies in prison.

See any connections? Hacker makes the book even more self-referential with this documentary inside the story. The book switches perspectives from first person to third person like a camera, almost like it were a movie, wherein one scene you are following one person about his life, and then it zooms out and shows multiple people wandering about. All of this makes, in my opinion, Hacker not a great author but a great artist.

May 22, Larry H rated it really liked it. What is art, and how far should you go to pursue it? Are there lines that shouldn't be crossed, people who shouldn't be sacrificed, or does art supersede everything else? These are a few of the questions addressed in Christopher Hacker's intriguing, somewhat frustrating, and slightly disturbing new novel, The Morels. Arthur Morel is a writer whose first novel was published to some acclaim, but in his everyday life, he is struggling as an adjunct college professor. Socially awkward and idiosyncrat What is art, and how far should you go to pursue it?

Socially awkward and idiosyncratic, Arthur is married to beautiful pastry chef Penelope, and together they are raising their inquisitive and creative year-old son, Will. Arthur's second novel follows characters named Arthur, Penny, and Will, seemingly a barely fictionalized account of their lives and their struggles. But one incident in the book, involving "Arthur" and an eight-year-old "Will," so pushes the boundaries that people—Penelope and her family included—are no longer sure if this was something Arthur dreamed up or if was something that really happened.

And that nagging question eats away at Arthur's relationships with his wife and son, as well as society in general. But more frustratingly, Arthur's rationale for writing this scene and his refusal to recant or apologize for it threatens to tear his marriage—and his life—apart. The Morels is narrated by Chris, an old classmate of Arthur's who now works as a sometime filmmaker and an usher at a movie theater, who becomes reacquainted with Arthur by chance. And as he spends more time with his old classmate, Chris realizes that Arthur has never outgrown his penchant for the dramatic or his frustrating reverence for art.

But Chris also envies the stability that he sees Arthur taking for granted—the beautiful wife, the loving son, the career. As events unfold in Arthur's life following the release of his second book, Chris and his colleagues decide to produce a documentary about Arthur. And in the process they learn more about his life than they ever imagined, and how everything that occurred around him as a child led him on the path he now follows, and toward the perception that art is nobler than anything else. This book was, for the most part, tremendously compelling, although it made me uncomfortable from time to time.

I found Arthur's embrace and defense of artistic excellence, and his behavior throughout the book as shocking, frustrating, and perhaps somewhat unbelievable, but I couldn't pull myself away from finding out how the book—and Arthur's story—would resolve itself. While I felt as if Christopher Hacker veered a little off course occasionally, especially when the story spent too much time on the relationship of Arthur's parents, he definitely had some twists up his sleeve that I found really intriguing, some that made me wonder exactly what I had been reading.


  1. The Morels Story;
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The Morels is a book that somewhat defies explanation. And while it may make you uncomfortable, it definitely will make you think, and intrigue you as it pushes you beyond your comfort zone with its plot and the questions it raises. Posted by Larry at PM Aug 11, Mike Cuthbert rated it really liked it. This book demonstrates why you should read blurbs on the cover with great care.

The Morels- And You Know (Music Video)

Art Morel is a genius. That much is made clear by our anonymous narrator. Arthur is an accomplishe This book demonstrates why you should read blurbs on the cover with great care. Arthur is an accomplished musician but makes his big breakthrough with his first novel, an ostensible portrait of his family of eccentrics. We figure something is a bit off with Arthur when he replaces the cadenza in a Mozart Piano Concerto with a spectacular act of defecation right on stage during a student recital. He turns to fiction and creates an ending for his novel that is as shocking as the defecation.

Is it true or is it not? Is this truly a reflection of his family? Can the family survive it? Can Arthur? It was virtually a drug-addled open house, always jammed with artists, performers and pseudo artists and performers as well as armchair philosophers who came along for all the free sex. Nobody wants to believe Arthur because most of them need the scandal for reasons of their own.

The questions are big but they are answerable though perhaps not by the introverted Arthur whose life collapses around him. The Morels are a fascinating bunch but hardly loyal and first-time novelist Hacker does an excellent job of letting the differences, personal and philosophical, play themselves out. Arthur is a sympathetic character and you will discover why he does some of the bizarre things he does.

Whether or not you accept his reasons is up to you but it makes for a distinct and rational conclusion to the story. Good reading. Jun 13, Genevieve rated it really liked it. Though narrated by spectator and sort-of? When Morel's second novel -- ostensibly autobiographical in nature, featuring a main character named Art Morel with a wife and child with the names and likenesses of their real-life counterparts -- is released, it threatens every facet of his family life, which is m Though narrated by spectator and sort-of?

When Morel's second novel -- ostensibly autobiographical in nature, featuring a main character named Art Morel with a wife and child with the names and likenesses of their real-life counterparts -- is released, it threatens every facet of his family life, which is maybe what Arthur intended. I mean, the last scene in the book features father-son incest. If he didn't expect any backlash, then he's full of shit. How much of Arthur's book is based on real-life events? Did Arthur really do To what degree does art -- music, literature, photography, whatever -- reflect real life, and to what degree does it create real life?

These questions might seem central to the novel, but although the whole disturbing scene is a driving force in the plot of The Morels , what the book really does is deal with the questions of art: What purpose should art serve? Should it reinforce what we believe about ourselves, or should it effect something more dangerous and sinister -- should art makes us question ourselves? Should art be only beautiful, or can art also be wretched, disturbing, riot-provoking work? Can art be therapeutic, cathartic, purifying -- and for whom, reader or writer? How far can we take it -- beyond the intellectualizing and theorizing of college classrooms, does art have real, concrete consequences?

Can we call an artist brave? Too far and not far enough. I don't know what I'm talking about anymore, but I feel like I'm not going to get over this book for a long time. Oh, and cons? Takes a while to really get going. Narrator is kind of a dick. Also: child abuse.

Jan 10, Liam rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Readers. Difficult, moving, and frustrating in alternating doses, Hacker's novel wrestles with a number of tough ideas regarding fiction, culpability, family, and the ferreting out of truth, to a mostly satisfying conclusion. We get through a number of flights and shifts the story of the titular family, and while I don't want to go too much into detail, I'll say that the book takes a very difficult and totally not neat twist, and dresses it with considerably lucid and compelling prose that propels you th Difficult, moving, and frustrating in alternating doses, Hacker's novel wrestles with a number of tough ideas regarding fiction, culpability, family, and the ferreting out of truth, to a mostly satisfying conclusion.

We get through a number of flights and shifts the story of the titular family, and while I don't want to go too much into detail, I'll say that the book takes a very difficult and totally not neat twist, and dresses it with considerably lucid and compelling prose that propels you through a number of eddies of plot and exposition, to its messy conclusion. And I'm glad it does, because it means that the veins of inquiry around which this novel's built, regarding truth's role in fiction, provocation in art, and the bloody unpacking of someone's personal history in the quest to understand their motives, power a fully-realized story, with weighty characters built on vivid detours, into New York of the recent past, into familial history and its inherent fucked-uppedness, and storytelling on paper and film.

I was recommended this by a friend and I traded a galley from my company for a galley of this. I'm glad, because I'm not certain I would have picked this up from just hearing a plot description, so while I reacognize that this frustrating vagueness may not be the book's greatest selling point, it, like so many difficult-to-summarize-or-pitch novels, should be given a chance, and with any luck, you will find yourself as engrossed done in less than 24 hours!


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Jun 26, Quinten rated it it was amazing Shelves: lit. The Morels tells the story of a disturbingly self destructive act: a man who writes a book of fiction that tears apart his family. We wonder why, but we discover that perhaps, the resulting impact was the goal of the book after all. The nature and purpose of art is questioned. The book asks us, is insider art really art? What space is left in an area like literature, or classical music, to truly create art, when the symphony is now a place for rich folks to applaud without understanding through The Morels tells the story of a disturbingly self destructive act: a man who writes a book of fiction that tears apart his family.

What space is left in an area like literature, or classical music, to truly create art, when the symphony is now a place for rich folks to applaud without understanding through their yawns? Should true art be subversive and challenge our assumptions?

Bay Nature: Where Do Morel Mushrooms Grow in Northern California

If so, what assumptions and taboos are left to challenge to create real art? Does art need to be destructive, risky, to challenge us? Ultimately the author does not take a sympathetic look at the protagonist's approach to these questions, nor do we come to like the title character. However we come to deeply understand the motivations. The conclusion is both inevitable and disturbing as the conclusion of the novel within the novel.

Nothing feels forced or gimmicky about the book despite the lofty premise. It was hard to put it down and the questions raised stay with you. Be warned several scenes are emotionally disturbing. Jul 24, Linda rated it did not like it. Let's start with the title, obviously a play on morals. Tee hee. Arthur was a jerk from birth, even though he had a ridiculous upbringing he was still an attention craving eg Ugh.

Arthur was a jerk from birth, even though he had a ridiculous upbringing he was still an attention craving egotistical jerk and I had no sympathy for him. And gee poor Will-the alleged victim of incest, or wait, was he?? Only a childless group of men like the filmmakers would find this child amusing. I am sure this book will get all sorts of press and maybe even awards.

Obviously Mr. Hacker is a smart guy with a big vocabulary and vast knowledge of music. But we do not need that crammed down our throats. This book, like many of its characters, doesn't want to be liked. So maybe two stars is unfair, since it was successful. But the structure was clunky, the plot felt padded, and the conclusions weren't as profound as the author hoped.

Also, can we start proofreading books again? That would be great. Because roofs have "eaves," not "eves. Jun 20, Steve Bauman rated it it was amazing. It starts off as a little character study, then has its major "holy shit" moment It's almost too good, too clever, and the final twist would be pretty contrived in weaker hands. But yeesh, good job, man.

Jun 09, Amy rated it it was ok. Too clever by half, derivative of another novel and if I named that novel, I'd be giving a spoiler , and with a clunky narrative structure that left me wondering "Why??? Feb 27, Erin Jooss rated it liked it. This book was so unusual, I don't know how to rate it. It was both memorable and disturbing. I didn't feel like the characters were very well fleshed-out, but it seemed to be more about the philosophy of art, than the character arcs anyway. I'm not sure I'd recommend it to just anyone, but I'd be interested to hear what my friends think of it and the philosophy within.

Anyway, it was worth reading to the end. Mar 17, Shawn rated it really liked it. Mar 19, Ed Gibney rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , writing. It's been a few months since I read this now, but The Morels has really stuck with me. I find that the characters and the issues they deal with really raised a lot of questions that I still think about from time to time in my daily life and in my own writing. Hacker's prose makes the pages skip by luxuriously and enjoyably, but the subject matters he deals with manage to lodge themselves deep inside you—that is no mean feat! What is the purpose of art?

What are the lines between fantasy and real It's been a few months since I read this now, but The Morels has really stuck with me. What are the lines between fantasy and reality? What lines should never be crossed? Do we need to be provoked to notice?