PDF 419

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online 419 file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with 419 book. Happy reading 419 Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF 419 at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF 419 Pocket Guide.

Although this site concentrates mainly on the Nigerian scam , we are happy to deal with other types of scams if and when the opportunity arises. We also have a large team of experts dedicated to the removal and closure of fake scammer banks and sites. Even if you are a newcomer, much fun can be had and at the same time you will be doing a public service.

If you are new to this game and need to know what scambaiting is all about, please click on the FAQ link at the top of the page. See also Baiting Tips for information on getting started on this great cyber-sport. We encourage everyone to contribute to this site and the good cause of scambaiting by joining in the fun on the FORUM where you can meet new friends and seek expert help, tips and advice on anti-scamming. User participation is absolutely encouraged. Please help us to raise awareness the world over! Do not be fooled into thinking scammers operate from a specific part of the world.

Advance fee fraud scammers are a world-wide menace, and they operate from every continent. These scammers range from small one-man-band criminals scamming a few thousand dollars a year, to highly organised groups raking in hundreds of thousands of dollars a month. Please take time to read our article, " The Ethics of Scambaiting " and also the following important information. Back in August of , I did a little two-part posting featuring some advice for new baiters from the perspective of a relatively new baiter.

Here, though the time is now and the poverty, corruption, fear and desperation are heart-rending, Nevertheless, this is a well-plotted and controlled book that also demonstrates both human passion and frailty. In a strange way, it's also ennobling and inspiring. View 1 comment. Nov 08, Linda rated it it was amazing Shelves: kobo-read , favorites , library-book-club , giller-prize-winners. This is a story about a man who was duped by a Nigerian scam artist. I was immersed in this story from the beginning. So vivid was it that I could smell and taste Nigeria as I was reading. I think we all have received these types of letters and emails, usually from someone calling himself "Mr.

For anyone who uses the internet, this is a must read.

See a Problem?

Sep 05, Esil rated it really liked it. I am not sure that it was my favourite book on the Giller list, but I enjoyed reading it. I appreciated the complexity of the interrelated stories and especially all the different threads of Nigeria that were depicted. In the acknowledgments Ferfuson suggests that this was based on a true story. I would be curious to know more about the true story.

Apr 04, Shelley added it. Overall I would have to say I enjoyed this book, although I found some parts very slow and almost boring while others caught my interest and wanting to know more. View all 5 comments. Dec 11, Shannon rated it really liked it. Overall, I enjoyed reading this. I found the writing to be a bit clunky, and the changes of narrator to be abrupt and confusing - it took me a while to sink into the novel, as I was getting comfortable with the circumstances of each narrator.

The story itself, though, was original and intriguing - centering around young people in Nigeria who commit fraud by luring people into sending them money via the internet - the classic "Nigerian prince in trouble" scams that most of us filter right to our Overall, I enjoyed reading this. The story itself, though, was original and intriguing - centering around young people in Nigeria who commit fraud by luring people into sending them money via the internet - the classic "Nigerian prince in trouble" scams that most of us filter right to our inboxes, referred to as "" scams.

The central theme that stood out to me had to do with guilt and responsibility, and the escalation of retribution and entitlement. Do foreign companies have the right to purchase oil from Nigeria, decimating the culture and means to life of citizens? Do these citizens have the right to fight back, vandalizing and "stealing" from the oil companies? Do people living in America and other countries benefiting from foreign oil have the right to a good life fuelled by the oil and profits extracted from places like Nigeria?

Do young Nigerians, displaced and dispossessed by deals made between governments and international business interests, have the right to steal it back through a scam? Is it more unfair that a Nigerian boy should have his village, family, and dreams dashed by the interests of oil companies, or that this boy should drive a trusting, kind American to suicide by scamming him out of his life savings?

Definitely worth picking up. Mar 01, Anna rated it liked it. At the section titled "Fuel," I started to get interested in this book. But unfortunately, that was about half way through its pages. Prior to that point in the novel, I found myself becoming repeatedly annoyed by the writing.

The book starts with choppy sentence fragments tha At the section titled "Fuel," I started to get interested in this book. The book starts with choppy sentence fragments that seem designed to function as cinematic montage, quickly introducing us to the different worlds inhabited by the main characters by setting their disparate moods - from lush jungle to parched desert and to the car crash on a deserted road late at night in an unnamed Canadian city.

I don't know as much about the craft of writing as I do that of cinema, but I know that in filmic storytelling, you can only get away with that kind of fast editing at the outset of your tale if you can immediately invest it with narrative and emotional intensity so it really throws the whole thing into gear right away. Otherwise you have to wait until the viewer is particularly heavily invested in the story first. But in this case, the fragmentation of the beginning, and in fact, first half of the novel with its eventually-to-converge story lines popping back and forth, felt contrived.

I kept thinking that the author had switched to one of the other stories because he'd run out of ways to continue the part he'd been writing and decided to try to amp up the interest by pointing to something else. I actually ended up skimming through a few chapters — not what I'd expected from the winner of the Giller prize. What made this book worth reading, in the end, were the descriptions of Nigeria and the way that energy colonialism decimates not only a landscape, but human relationships and the structure of the colonized society.

I don't know how Nigerians would respond to this book. Perhaps it would seem artificial to them, but to me, although I've never been to Nigeria, the description of this world seemed real and honest and present on the page. And Will Ferguson gets points for not trying to make this a story where everything turns out okay in the end, because it isn't a world where that happens.

Just a few words about the characters: Amina was boring - a cipher, which I think is kind of insulting to anyone who might find herself in the position she was in. And by the way - why exactly was she on her lengthy pilgrimmage? Laura's purpose on the other hand was always very clear - perhaps a little too clear. I didn't really buy it.

Winston, the internet scam artist, was interesting, but his parents were a lot more interesting. I wanted to stay on after dinner and maybe spend the weekend with them. Nnamdi was likeable because he was clever and kind, but I couldn't help thinking that he was being set up for sacrifice spoiler alert so that the ending would leave that desired sour taste in the mouth. But what on earth was going on with Sergeant Brisebois?


  • Ashton to Middleton bus route | Transport for Greater Manchester.
  • 10 Ways To Create Workplace Harmony.
  • Wills Impact?

So he never rescued anyone. And …? Anyway, I thought I was going to write something a lot more positive than this when I sat down to write it. I'll keep reading Will Ferguson's books as they come out, and hoping that the clunkiness of this one was just because it was a first novel.

From all I know of is work, I think he's got some good things to say and will find more elegant ways of saying them. Apr 10, Arlene rated it really liked it. Is he deserving? I think so. As savvy readers, we know they will inevitably connect, but Ferguson unfolds the story carefully, so we must keep reading to see how these disparate threads intertwine. A significant portion of this book is set in Nigeria, and Ferguson does an outstanding job Dare I say prize-winning?

Ferguson wrote some beautiful phrases that I stopped and savoured. So, what are the flaws? Perhaps the subject? Most North Americans have armed themselves with spam filters and skepticism enough to avoid falling prey to schemes like those portrayed in the book. I had to read this book because it won the Giller Prize. I tried to set its prize-winning status aside when reading. Was it deserving? But you should definitely give the other shortlisted books a try, too.

Feb 17, Luanne Ollivier rated it really liked it. When I think of Canadian author Will Ferguson, it is his travel memoirs that immediately spring to mind. We've all received them. In fact Barrister Salvadore Gallarto sent me one this morning. Can I help him with repatriating 8. It's a simple matter really. I'm sure that every reader has had one of these land in our inbox.

Explore topics

And we promptly When I think of Canadian author Will Ferguson, it is his travel memoirs that immediately spring to mind. And we promptly trash them. But what if you didn't? Laura Curtis is heartbroken when her elderly father Henry is killed in an auto accident. But on further investigation, it appears he deliberately left the road. Why would he do such a thing? Further digging by the local Calgary police on his computer uncovers the truth - he had become embroiled in a scam On the other side of the world in Nigeria, we follow the story of Winston - a scammer.

And Amina - a young pregnant woman walking her way across the country, escaping from something. And Nnamdi, a young man from the depths of the Niger Delta. In the beginning, I wondered how these disparate stories would tie together, but Ferguson deftly weaves an absolutely riveting plot. The criminal underbelly of Nigeria is presented in all of it's seediness.

But really, it is the story of Nnamdi that captured me the most. His story is given the most page space and he is the character I felt I 'knew' the most. The effect of the oil industry on a country and its' people is disheartening. The death of her father changes Laura as well. She becomes single minded, after years of staying safely within the confines of the small world she has created. She decides to go to Nigeria and find the man responsible for her father's death. I didn't feel I really got to know Laura and found her sudden about face to be a bit of a stretch.

I turned the final page with a sense of sadness. Varying degrees, but for most of the characters. Ferguson's tale of the story behind one of these schemes brings a very human face to what most see as a simple nuisance entry handled by a quick tap on the delete button. An unusual, introspective and recommended read.

Jul 27, Anne Patton rated it it was amazing. It took two readings for me to totally appreciate this book. On second reading I was rivetted by the complex issues in the Niger Delta and the sensitive young man Nnamdi had my complete sympathy. In a decade he was propelled from a happy childhood in a remote jungle village to the ugly realities of ruthless exploitation by the It took two readings for me to totally appreciate this book.

In a decade he was propelled from a happy childhood in a remote jungle village to the ugly realities of ruthless exploitation by the oil industry. This book is so multi-layered that you need to read it several times to savour everything.

Seafarer form 419

Without giving away the plot I loved the Canadian main character, a mousy, withdrawn copy editor who is almost a hermit in her small apartment in Calgary - a most unlikely heroine, indeed. Her skill at recognizing patterns in spelling errors is the exact skill needed to crack the scam that snared her father! In addition the reader follows the tracks of three young Nigerians until all four characters become entangled in a terrifying, high-stakes weekend.

If you ever had a impulse to open one of those emails from Colonel Somebody, High Ranking Official in the Nigerian government Jan 30, Patricia rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. I finished a week ago and it still haunts me. I have no doubt that it will continue to do so for a very long time. From its opening line to its final word, the story is drenched in conflict and intrigue. Separate story lines and common themes volley back and forth between Alberta, Canadian and Nigerian locations, culminating in a toxic brew o I finished a week ago and it still haunts me. Separate story lines and common themes volley back and forth between Alberta, Canadian and Nigerian locations, culminating in a toxic brew of greed and restitution.

Powerful, riveting, heartbreaking and fascinating. Well deserved of its Giller Prize, jumps to the top of my recommendation list. Oct 06, Debbie rated it really liked it. These scams are called s. After police determine that her father deliberately drove his car over a cliff to his death, Laura Curtis resolves to find out what drove her father to suicide, and left her mother with no assets.

[Season 3] Ep. 2 | Tower of God

When she discovers that he was the victim of a crime, she becomes obsessed with finding the author of the emails. The five story lines meet and run parallel, intertwine with, and oppose each other until the book reaches the totally unexpected at least by me climax that is seared into my brain. But the book was always easy to read and parts of the story will never leave me. It was perhaps coincidental that I was reading at the same time The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard, in which she explains the exploitation of third world people and natural resources by large corporations.

But I was, and it did. So — memorable story, a clearer understanding of third world exploitation, new knowledge about schemes and what drives some people to perpetrate them, and a tragic climax; but uneven character and plot development. Will it win the Giller? I think not. Should you read it? Oh, yes, definitely. Oct 05, Tyler Jones rated it really liked it Shelves: canadian-literature. Dear Mr. Ferguson, My compliments on writing a very good book that gives much enlightenment to the challenges we face here in Nigeria!

I am myself a student of creative writing and I appreciate the questions raised in your book which - in my opinion, lead the reader to think deeply on the subjects of greed, loyalty and guilt. In particular I have thought much about what we mean by the word "guilty". You are very good at creating characters we readers my care and believe in with the exception, pe Dear Mr. You are very good at creating characters we readers my care and believe in with the exception, perhaps, of the brother Warren, who is flat and does not convince me.

I must also please forgive me! It does not end on a true sounding note - if I may be so bold. Still, so very much to admire! You may count on me as one of you're most ardent readers! I too, Mr. I feel we have known each other even though we have not met - I too, Will, am a writer of Novels. Unfortunately my first completed work has fallen into the hands of unscrupulous publishers who have refused to pay me for my work and who have instead published my novel under a rival's name!

De vuelta al barrio - 05/07/2019 - Cap 419 - 2/5

This book has gone on to become a huge success here, selling many thousands of copies - and I have not seen a penny! Obviously my legal case against the publisher is strong, but, unfortunately, I lack the money necessary to hire a lawyer and pursue these rascals through the court system. Perhaps you, Will, may assist me in this regard? I assure you the money I require is not excessive, and in return I promise you a healthy share of the profits we are sure to recoup!

419 (disambiguation)

Nov 05, Randy Mcdonald rated it it was amazing Shelves: cultural-studies. I wasn't surprised when Will Ferguson 's novel won the Giller Award. From the moment I opened its pages, I knew that was superb. For starters, there's the compelling subject matter. In wintry Canada, a middle-aged man is killed in an unusual car accident. On closer examination, it turns out that the man's death was a suicide, that he took his own life after he had been taken over completely by a Nigerian scam.

In Nigeria, meanwhile, the people involved in this particular I wasn't surprised when Will Ferguson 's novel won the Giller Award. In Nigeria, meanwhile, the people involved in this particular scheme whether tangentially or otherwise live their difficult lives in a country beset by corruption and terrible instability. Things get taken up to eleven when the Canadian's daughter travels to Nigeria with the intent of making the people who took her father from her pay. I found this a very satisfying book.

I've been familiar with the mechanics of scams, and their place in our globalizing world, for a decade; a novel that treats the phenomenon fully is always welcome. A novel that has good plotting and compelling characters like is all the more welcome. Ferguson's writing style, meanwhile, has evolved substantially beyond the acute humour of his Canadian travelogues to really connect with the reader. Dec 08, Friederike Knabe rated it liked it Shelves: africa , canadian-lit. First impressions review to follow : there are several distinct story threads to the novel that, not surprisingly, will come together eventually, not all quite organically, though.

I found parts of the novel absorbing and very well imagined, others less so. To me the Canadian thread was least well developed, the story of the "Ijaw boy" the best as long as it was separate from the other threads. Having read I Do Not Come to You by Chance by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani just prior to this one, I was pro First impressions review to follow : there are several distinct story threads to the novel that, not surprisingly, will come together eventually, not all quite organically, though. Ferguson lacked the sense of humour and satire that Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani has demonstrated.

More to come Feb 10, Tomi rated it it was ok. Writing style aside, not really my cup of tea as it seemed pretentious, and i didn't particularly enjoy the constant jump between characters my biggest issue with were the errors. He incorrectly identifies some places and words with a different tribe as though all of his research was off google. The misinformation and misrepresentation of an entire country by a supposed 'author' was ter as a Nigerian, I was quite excited to read this but that excitement faded rather early on into the book.

The misinformation and misrepresentation of an entire country by a supposed 'author' was terribly disappointing, not to mention that I personally found it quite boring, it dragged on and on. The end was especially unexpected and unnecessary in my opinion. I understand that its fiction but i would think a writer owes it to his readers to thoroughly research his subject matter before publication. Dec 14, Magdelanye rated it really liked it Recommends it for: on paths unknown, fight paths. Shelves: family-trauma , postmodern-fiction , culture-conflict , displacement , ethics , social-commentary , travel.

The human memory is like a salamander For all their differences, over the course of the telling, certain similarities are also revealed that transform the lives of all of the participants in unexpected ways. It is a testament to the writers skill that even though none of the characters are particularly nic The human memory is like a salamander It is a testament to the writers skill that even though none of the characters are particularly nice, I empathized with them all.

The writing was rather thrilling too, a thriller for people who don't particularly care for mystery. Readers also enjoyed. About Will Ferguson. Will Ferguson. Will Ferguson is an award-winning travel writer and novelist. His last work of fiction, , won the Scotiabank Giller Prize. His new novel, The Shoe on the Roof , will be released October 17, Visit him at WillFerguson. He married his wife Terumi in Kumamoto, Japan, in They now live in Calgary with their two sons. After coming back from Japan he experienced a reverse culture shock, which became the basis for his first book Why I Hate Canadians.

With his brother, Ian Ferguson, he wrote the bestselling sequel How to be a Canadian. His debut novel, Happiness , was sold into 23 languages around the world. Books by Will Ferguson. Trivia About No trivia or quizzes yet. Quotes from My fear is that when the time comes, I'll have to watch all those moments again. Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. It is the only question that needs answering. Four storylines emerge from the opening section, each connected — though not always directly — to the car-crash death of Henry Curtis, a retired Calgary school teacher.

More troubling clues come to light. The novel comes to life when Ferguson dispenses with jarring short scenes and fully immerses readers in the intersecting stories that propel the narrative toward a series of dramatic collisions and reconciliations. The novel is further enlivened by sharp dialogue and imagery.


  1. INDIVIDUAL TICKETS.
  2. Nigerian scams statistics.
  3. Sorry, we couldn't find any results for '$$searchTerm$$'?
  4. A cold city, exhaling steam. Hopefully Ferguson finds equally compelling material to work with in his next novel, be it comic or otherwise, and this time trusts his gut a little more. Order this book on Amazon.